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. progresso. i just served my mother-in-law your chicken noodle soup but she loved it so much... i told her it was homemade. everyone tells a little white lie now and then. but now she wants my recipe [ clears his throat ] [ softly ] she's right behind me isn't she? [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. [ clears his throat ] is bigger than we think ... ssometimelike the flu.fer frome? with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year and older whose flu symptoms started within the last two days. before taking tamiflu tell your doctor if you're pregnant, nursing. have serious health conditions, or take other medicines. if you develop an allergic reaction, a severe rash, or signs of unusual behavior, stop taking tamiflu and call your doctor immediately. children and ad
or may not know because of the long history of copyright law in the library of congress this jefferson building is quite literally the house that copyright bills. let me start by introducing briefly the distinguished . let me start by introducing briefly the distinguished panel that we have. to my left is tom allen, former congressman from maine and chief executive officer of the association of american publishers. to his left his james shapiro, who is a professor of english and a shakespearean scholar and an author and vice president of the author's built, a professor at columbia university. thank you for coming down from new york. did you also come down from new york? from washington. you are everywhere. then we have peter jaszi, professor of copyright law at the washington college of law, american university, also an author. i will say also peter would not want me to, recently given the great honor by his colleagues at the washington college of law to have a lecture named after him. congratulations and thank you for joining us. [applause] so our topic is copyright and the book. very
but this is not the present i wanted. >> it is always the mother-in-law. come on, is that not too stereo typical. wouldn't you rather have the mother-in-law help you clean up in the clean up or husband or grandfather or a bunch of screnaling kids. >> it is because the mother-in-laws do help. the father-in-laws show up and grab a beer. be honest . sit down on a couch and where's football . johnnie, how are you these past couple of months . they are sitting there with salted nuts and a beer. mother-in-laws come and try to help . they end up having a conflict, right. it is territorial and we have the quish over here and turkey over here and i am doing it my way. am i wrong? >> this is why i don't have a mother-in-law. it is a big problem. i see no need for a mother-in-law at this point. >> i will take a mother-in-law as opposed to a housefull of screaming kids that are being bratty. >> it was cleaned up and watching the kids and my wife was able to focus on doing the meal and a well oiled machine. e-mail us and tweet us as well. >> we are down to the wire. >> final day to run out and get last minute christmas gi
if the deal is not reached this week, but potential strike, law shoreman threatening to walk off the ports in the east on gulf coast. this could disrupt billions of dollars in shipments. joining us now ed butowsky, a hell of a way to start a week with the threat after strike. to put it in context, when l.a. had a dock workers strike ten years ago, it cost a billion dollars a day. this is going to affect ports in newark, houston, miami, this could be several billion dollar hits every day to our economy? >> yeah, and i tell you, when you look at it, it's really similar. there are some parallels to the fiscal cliff discussion. because the arguments are about are the royalty payments that the dock workers get for bringing merchandise on board and unloading the cargo and what the similarity is really that we're not-- they're not talking about more business, they're talking about how do we split up the same pie and same thing with the fiscal cliff, we're not talking growing the economy, how do you split up the economy getting the tax revenue and the same thing with the longshoreman strike. which
. but how do you define and that codify that into law? that's a much trickier issue. david: that was scott rasmussen with the latest poll on gun control and don't forget to tune into varney 9:20 sharp. and nicole-- okay, we'll go back to nicole, as soon as we find her, she's wandering the floor of the nyse. and stuart may be out this christmas eve, that doesn't mean he isn't spreading holiday cheer. liston what he has to say at 10:45, a christmas message from stuart. meanwhile, we are headed towards the fiscal cliff and if congress doesn't act soon the the u.s. economy could take a nosedive right off it. all this have comes as capitol hill, could a value-added tax be in the pipeline? are we slowly turning to europe. david, good to see you. and we already see us moving in terms of spending to the european model. will we move in terms of tax policy to the european model, specifically to a value-added tax like they have in most of europe? >> personally i think we should. >> on top of what we have, on top of an income tax. >> we need to cut back and what i would cut back is replacement for the
. they were passing right-to-work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. so states like mississippi, states like georgia and texas and florida and southern california, arizona, north carolina are all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. really does three from 1964 to two dozen eight could be thought of as kind of the carried of sun belt dominance in american presidential history. if you think about every president elected from 1964-2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected. he was not even elected vice president. he was a michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year perio
, but that left his senate seat open. under colorado law, senate vacancy falls to the governor to decide, so the choice fell to governor bill ritter, a democrat. ritter made a call people did not expect. he didn't promote a congressman or mayor. he didn't go for a politician at all, in fact. he went for michael bennet, the superintendent of the denver public school system. bennett was, as you can imagine, excited. he was now a senator, a member of the world's most exclusive club. that is a big job. it is an impressive, big job. a job that makes you think pretty highly of yourself. what bennett was not prepared for was that when he took that big, important, impressive job, everybody would all of a sudden hate him. and they would hate him because they hate congress, and he was now part of congress, this thing that they hate. in november of 2011, bennett went down to the floor of the senate with a chart that is still one of my favorite charts of all time. it was a simple chart. it just showed how popular different things were. the irs, the people who collect taxes and audit you, 40% approval ra
refusing to support any new gun laws. >> senator feinstein's bill to -- is that going to pass? >> i think that's a phony piece of legislation, and i do not believe it will pass for this reason. it's all built on lies that have been found out. everything i hear -- i mean, my gosh. people in the media, i revere their communication skills, but they have an obligation to be factual, to be truthful, and everything that these politicians are saying about that is not true. >> pete williams is nbc's justice correspondent. pete, after the news conference on friday, we have that interview from wane la pierre sitting down with david gregory over the weekend. the interview really came as no surprise after what we witnessed on friday. >> it believes there are many -- sfwlo did he say, thomas, they want to encourage schools to -- the nra is willing to help train people, whether it's policemen or volunteers, whatever local school districts want to do -- >> it's gnting to satisfy the gun restrictions in the next senate. >> asa hutchinson, is now helming a model shield program that the nra is sponsoring t
to the people of cuba. the helms-burton law was not as effective as i would have liked. >> another issue out you are associated with is autism. how did that get started? >> my grandson was a very normal child. when he was 18 months to two years old, he got nine shots in one day. seven of which had thimerosol, mercury. it is a preservative. in 1929 it was tested on the 29 people who had meningitis. they said that the mercury had no impact so they started using solutions.halmologic when children get a few vaccinations, it did not have a huge impact but they started to get as many as 25 or 30 before they get to the first grade. my grandson got nine in one day and he became artistic, banging his head against the wall. then diary and constipation -- diarrhea and constipation. he was doing terrible. i was not aware of autism and all but i was chairman of the committee that did the investigation so i started to looking into with health and human services and the food and drug administration and that is where i had four years of hearings on that and i became convinced that women -- that mercury, women w
of renewable energy. these things are some of the changes in environmental law relative to the missions -- they are all part of that effort. we have got to do more. we have to build on that. but it is certainly a commitment. one thing we recognize is that it does not have to be a competition between our economy and our health, because renewable energy and clean energy have economic benefits that are pronounced, and people understand that. so we highlighted the issues we felt needed to be highlighted for voters who are going to make the decision in the election, but the president's agenda is reflected in his work, and i expect he will continue to work hard on this issue is. >> let's take these last questions as we wrap this up. >> thanks for coming back to the university of chicago. i have a quick follow up. yourding super pac's -- just now reclaim your concerns about an amended money in campaign financing. on the other hand, we saw earlier today had democrats were already oiling up their machines for 2014 and 2016. what are the prospects for repealing citizens united or comprehensive ca
the law firm anyway. it is a cultural thing, and folks don't necessarily want to change. you're talking about the scale of citizens that is a significant challenge from the cultural standpoint. standards need to evolve and architecture is of the application need to evolve with it. it is as simple as that. until those things happen, it is not going to happen. it is starting to happen from an application standpoint moving to the enterprise -- we are seeing it happen certainly in the commercial side. >> let me lay out a plausible scenario. i cannot say this is the way it is going to happen. i think that electronic voting will be one of these overnight major election shifts, not a gradual buildup. i also think we have missed the online website version of that. part because it has not shown its reliable and secure. there is a very rapid emerging -- i think it will sweep through the country similarly with your cellphone is essentially part of your identity for processing. >> there will be some experimentation -- it will be lots of little elections and all of a sudden it will hit a major state
and lawmaker want to toughen drunk driving laws. >>> but first here's a look at last night's winning lottery numbers. hey, look! a shooting star! make a wish! i wish we could lie here forever. i wish this test drive was over, so we could head back to the dealership. [ male announcer ] it's practically yours. test drive! but we still need your signature. volkswagen sign then drive is back. and it's never been easier to get a jetta. that's the power of german engineering. get $0 down, $0 due at signing, $0 deposit, and $0 first month's payment on any new volkswagen. visit vwdealer.com today. >>> an 11 news follow-up to an i team investigation. you maybe remember the story of an army veteran who's learning to walk again after an alleged drufrn driving accident. now new charngs have been filed in that case. >> this morning barry simms explores efforts by prosecutors and police to toughen maryland drunk driving laws. >> with every move, 27-year-old jimmy toledo focuses on recovery and self-reliance. >> push. push. >> initially depending on his hand, and now slowly his feet. >> whoa, big step. who
you know, i don't think any of us want to live in a law also world. but we also don't want somebody telling us what to do all the time especially a world that's changing so much. let me just give you another example. as a participant do you want to be a helicopter parent? we all look at that, parents who are continually trying to make sure nothing bad happens to their kids, and their kids grow up neurotic. no, you want your kids to explore, have their own self-esteem. you want them to go out in the world and make mistakes that they learn from, and why wouldn't we want that for our society. >> gavin: quick point, i noticed you tweeted that you were going to run out and get those google glasses, not over hyped? you think we'll be walking around with glasses-- >> no, i don't know that we'll all be--i just--first of all i think it's really important to realize that this notion that we're going to be looking at screens is over hyped. that's one of the things that people haven't quite realized. there is more and more technology that will mean that we don't need to look at screens. going b
. critics say it restricts freedom and expands the influence of islamic law. president morsi and supporters says moderate democratic state in fighting depression, dictatorship, nepotism and corruption. the holiday shopping season is drawing to a close so bring on the after christmas deals and you can bet retailers will do whatever they can to get you back in their stores. because overall, holiday sales numbers are way way down. context and perspective from the fox business network ahead. plus, the healthcare overhaul. the super size drink ban, remember that. and the west nile virus some of the stories making health headlines in 2012. a look back when we come back. >> harris: just into fox news, commenting on his condition. situation. former president bush 88 years old has been in the hospital for about a month and we learned today doctors have put him in the intensive care unit. >> the president was admitted to the -- icu, the intensive care unit at methodist on sunday. he has been dealing with a series of set backs that includes a persistent fever and and doctors are doing everything they
. america's largest gun rights group says we don't need new laws. chip reid is in washington with that story. chip, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, jeff. the national rifle association was silent in the days following the tragedy in newtown. now it's speaking out and reigniteing an explosive debate over gun control. the nra says it will not budge from its longtime opposition to gun control, insisting the only thing that will stop school shootings is armed guards. >> if it's crazy to call for putting police and armed security in our school to protect our children, then call me crazy. i think the american people think it's crazy not to do it. it's the one thing that would keep people safe and the nra is going to try to do that. >> reporter: nra president david kean added that banning particular guns simply doesn't work. >> we had a so-called assault weapons ban for ten years. it was allowed to expire. the fbi, the justice department and others who studied it said it made no difference. so if we're looking at things that are effective, let's talk abo
. >> with that perspective, now that the affordable care act will begin to become fully finalized into law over the next couple years, we keep hearing those on the conservative side is concerns about what it will do to the country. what are your concerns? will this be a good thing? >> yes, it will. right now, we have $50 billion a year of uncompensated care. people who do not have insurance, do not have medicaid, medicare, private insurance, mode carry coverage, they are not insured. they have access to health care in emergency rooms and if they cannot pay, and they do not go to bankruptcy, it costs -- the care does not go away. it is shifted to the rest of us who do have insurance. $50 billion. it could be as much as $1,500 per person. paying for those who do not. you have everybody in the system all injured one way or another, then the uncompensated care goes away. it is no longer borne by those of us who are beneficiaries of an insurance program. that alone is a hidden tax people do not focus on unless it is pointed out to them. it raises the cost to everyone else. the fact never gets talked about. s
of these people trying to leave the in-laws house. >> rick: we learned the other day that gretchen loves her in-laws. >> gretchen: exactly, because there was a study and the mother-in-law takes the hit. >> rick: there must be a few people who say i can only handle three days of her. i can't go home -- >> gretchen: are you going to help them out. >> rick: you might have to spend four or five days there, get ready. find some way tie a break. there will be really big storms. >> gretchen: let's talk about this morning with an extreme weather alert. deadly storm system that slammed the midwest, snow and tornadoes heading northeast this morning. >> oh, my god, look. that's a tornado. oh, wow. oh, jesus, look at that tornado. >> gretchen: so that tornado spotted in mobile, alabama. am i saying that correctly? >> rick: yeah. mobile. >> gretchen: okay, good. one of the hardest hit cities, tens of thousands of people there waking up the day after christmas now without power. >> when it calmed down, we looked and everything seemed green, like it was popping off transformers left and right. we heard a noise. i
in the virginia state house. he's proposed a new law for schools in his state which would mean arming teachers. now, i want to ask you this. good morning to you, sir. are you saying that teachers should be able to carry guns in school or be required to carry guns in school? >> no. you're overstating it. look at the situation. arm some teachers, arm some school personnel who voluntarily participate in this. one of the problems that you have is that when you have an area that's a gun-free zone, criminals don't pay attention to this. shootings which have occurred to 1950 to the present with one exception where there's three or more people killed have occurred in areas that are gun-free zones. that's the problem. i want people to be able to have after they receive equivalent law enforcement training which would take about four to eight weeks, the same training that a policeman would have. so if a policeman comes on to campus later, he knows somebody there who knows the building, who knows how to respond. first thing, who knows when ton brandish a gun. no, i'm not arming everybody. this is not cowb
intriguing people. [ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. i just served my mother-in-law your chicken noodle soup but she loved it so much... i told her it was homemade. everyone tells a little white lie now and then. but now she wants my recipe [ clears his throat ] [ softly ] she's right behind me isn't she? [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. >>> after a brutal winter storm caused major headaches for people in the midwest who, well, the east coast, now they can expect guess what, more snow. this weekend, bonnie schneider is here to tell us which areas will be hardest hit. >> martin, looking at a lot of snow for new england, especially in the southeastern seconds of massachusetts. what's happening with this system is it's doing a meteorological phenomenon called bombing out. it means the low will deepen rapidly. and that will only intensify the storm in terms of bursts of snow as well as strong winds. you can see our radar picture shows we still have lighter snow falling in new york city, northern new jersey, connecticut and into massachusetts. but that rain is kind of swee
change in gun law, he either refused to answer or changed the subject. he finished by saying the gun is the tool. the problem is the criminal. >> let me ask you about another washington story. we're nine days away from going over the fiscal cliff. any progress to speak of today? >> there are a number of members of congress today asking that the president and the speaker try one more time. both republicans and democrats in the senate are saying the chances of that big debt-reducing deal really are lost. it's now a small deal, they expect it out of the senate probably later this week. >> david kerley reporting from washington tonight. thank you. >>> speaking of president obama, he attended the burial today of long-time hawaii senator, daniel inouye. it was a 19-gun salute when the senator's coffin arrived at the national memorial cemetery of the pacific. senator inouye was the first japanese american elected to both houses of congress. he was also the second longest serving senator in american history. he was 88 years old. >> the other big story we're following tonight, with a third of
, who does that help? >> i spent the day on the phone yesterday with the law enforcement community up there. what we gather is the police chiefs don't like it. the elective sheriff, he doesn't like it p. and as we learned from the comments in the newspaper, the gun owners certainly don't like it. that leaves the remaining sector finding the article interesting. >> what do they say about it? >> police chiefs look at it and say, look 40% of these people holding the gun mer mitts are active or retired law enforcement. these are people who may have put people in prison or prison guard who inmates might be looking for their home address and now it's point and click. the other thing is that 8,000 -- i mean if you just take rockland county, 8 thousand either active or retires nypd officers live there. so within the law enforcement community, they say you're giving the people a map to our home addresses that's searchable. >> one of the criticisms here is that potential robbers are going to know who has guns and who doesn't to know which homes to target. how does this make
and stupid, you die. >> they don't have rule of law? >>guest: they don't have rule of law or access to credit and they are locked in a vicious circle poverty. it takes a small investment to get them out of that. to me it shows the aptitude of people. when a young couple decide to grab if the kingdom and to have two children, they invest in the children and they take off. we have two-child families from here and onward. the world is governed from that. it is not the big corporations or banks that run the economy, it is the young couple who decide to work. >> when they are educated with wealth they . >> are helpful. this fantastic investment in vaccinations that helps so do you not have a kid who is physically handicapped for life, that drags the family down. the way that government sources are used is crucial. there are some things like advancement and research and primary school we need the government money but it has to be controlled. >> thank you, sir. next, you want to live to be 150? my next guest says the first person to do so my have already been born. it might be you. do you want to li
. >> they don't have rule of law? >>guest: they don't have rule of law or access to credit and they are locked in a vicious circle poverty. it takes a small investment to get them out of that. to me it shows the aptitude of people. when a young couple decide t grab if the kingdom and to have two children, they invest in the children and they take off. we have two-child families from here and onward. the world is governed from that. it is not the big corporations or banks that run the economy, it is the young couple who decide to work. >> when they are educated with wealth they . >> are helpful. this fantastic investment in vaccinations that helps so do you not have a kid who is physically handicapped for life, that drags the family down. the wa that government sources are used is crucial. there are some things like advancement and research and primary school we need the government money but it has to be controlled. >> thank you, sir. next, you want to live to be 150? my next guest says the first person to do so my have already been born. it might be you. do you want to live to be 150? i don't.
to serve. i just served my mother-in-law your chicken noodle soup but she loved it so much... i told her it was homemade. everyone tells a little white lie now and then. but now she wants my recipe [ clears his throat ] [ softly ] she's right behind me isn't she? [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. advil pm® or tylenol pm. the advil pm® guy is spending less time lying awake with annoying aches and pains and more time asleep. advil pm®. the difference is a better night's sleep. patrick dempsy has a strong tie to the city. wish him luck. back to you. >> clayton: lack of security. and so we thought according to the new york post security officials that were sacked after the release of the benghazi report are still on the government's pay roll and will be back to school with work. here is the reaction lieutenant cornel tony schafer. when you heard the report that came out around christmas, what did you think? it is an extended montyepython skit. the idea here is that these people are not held accountable . this is but one more layier clayton of regarding the whole ben
guest. it is the mother-in-law . but the father-in-law is not too far behind either. one los angeles parking enforcer on the naughty les. he slapped a parking ticket on santa's dislay . the man dressed like mr. clause tried to get out of the fine. but the parking enforcer was not feeling the spirit. >> not nice. it is time now for your response. earlier in the show we told you about stores staying open for the around the clock for the last minute shoppers. >> we wanted to know if you are done with the holiday shopping. james responded. i got my holiday shopping done in november and december so i can avoid the rush. first time ever on christmas eve, i have not finished my shopping . >> justin said my wife and i were 99 percent done three weeks before thank thank. thanks to everyone that responded. morey christmas to you and your family. we hope you ren joytonight on
in the development of international refugee law policy. the international office of refugees who won the 1938 nobel peace prize. he yearns to -- diaspora and he was the russians could do something that can to the inspiring recent flight across the atlantic. in 1928 he decided it was up to him to do a tattered to mail in equivalent to go around the world alone by bicycle. luckily he didn't have to do that. he departed shanghai on a better bicycle but upgraded to a new bicycle in bangkok into a secondhand motorcycle in singapore. the benefactor gave him a brand-new aeriel motorcycle in karachi plus a letter the guaranteed parts and assistance in aerial offices around the world. in his published a county think the worldwide services of the ymca ,-com,-com ma shell oil and the firestone company and he depended on the global availability of gasoline, oil and food. the array of industry of good services that were now spread almost everywhere in the world. like the circumspect wing south asian diaspora he made his transit with think richmond of scattered white russians. above all there was his passport fo
law legalizing same-sex marriage went into effect at midnight, 12:01 a.m. today. some ceremonies were held overnight. same-sex marriage became legal in maryland on tuesday. become legal on tuesday. >>> and finally, talk about living on the edge. in massachusetts, several homes on plum island are in danger of plunging into the atlantic ocean. thursday's storms and pounding waves are threatening their foundations. two homes are so unstable the homeowners can't get inside to retrieve their belongings. >>> now, time to ginger and the weather. >> pittsburgh, getting more snow this morning. and they're about 27 of so getting up early this morning. some more cold air behind it. and the snowstorm we've been talking about before the broadcast, now moving into northeast new england. winter storm warnings there in pink. and the lows combine. it will be rainy in parts of the carolinas. but then it will start to intensify and drop snow in connecticut, rhode island and massachusetts, in the heart of where all that snow will intensify. back into parts of new york and pennsylvania. you'll still get s
justice sonia sotomayor refusing to block the contraceptives mandate in president obama's health care law. let me explain this. two companies, hobby lobby arts and crafts stoerds and mardell christian bookstores argue that requiring their group's health care plans to cover contraception violates their religious beliefs. sotomayor who hears emergency appeals said the companies didn't qualify for an injunction while they challenged the requirement in court. she did not rule on the merits of the company's religious-based claims just yet. >>> we've told you about those long delays at the airports thanks to this monumental winter storm. well, in dallas get a load of this. cnn affiliate wfaa reports that one american airlines flight sat stranded at the gate for nearly five hours. one passenger reportedly said the airline told them they could get off, but at the same time warned them they could be leaving at any minute so nobody knew what to do. now listen to the pilot's apology to his passengers. >> it's beyond reproach. i have no words to tell you how sorry i am for all of this. decisions are
. >>> and this is interesting if you have been following the herbalife story. they're working with the law firm-by-schiller, in connection with the fight with billackman. shorting the company. last week he revealed he had been shorting the stock. the "wall street journal" saying it's not clear what counsel the corporate litigator could be offering herbalife, you can imaginin it's going to get tough and aggressive. at some point we've got to talk about julian -- julian robertson on twitter. if we'll consider that a headline. if he's on twitter -- >> did you know about this? >> no. >> there's a handle -- >> i've seen other people that it's obviously not them -- >> this could be him, though. and there's a big debate. a raging debate going on line about whether julian robertson is actually tweeting or not. you have a view? >> i -- i'm going shy away from this conversation other than -- >> we need to find out, though. >> other than to say it's a raging debate. >> i e-mailed him. this julian robertson -- >> how do you know you're e-mailing the right one? >> wow. >> because i have e-mailed with him pr
be the network of a law firm that perhaps, you know, only spans from new york to los angeles. it might be a network like facebook or google. but what's striking and necessary to understand the way it manifests itself physically is that networks carry networks. you might have a global backbone company like a level three or a tata that own the strands of glass and that own the conduits that might run perhaps beside railroad tracks across the country. you might have another company, sort of a mid-sized network services company, one called hurricane electric, that might actually illuminate those strands of glass. they might own the light. ask and then you might have a goldman sachs or large law firm that buys bandwidth on that glass. so it's, you know, we often talk about b the information superhighway as if the network itself were the highway. i hike to think of it more -- i like to think of it more that a given network is a car chugging along the highway side by side with other networks because there's definitely a layering going on that's crucial to understanding the way in which the ne
.s. ally? and yes we obviously respect international law. can't someone at the state department make a phone call to say there is probably a clerical issue here. >> i will tell from you personal experience the police down there is an utter disaster. i have known friends, even relatives who have been locked up down there if for no other reason to get money. stolen watches from people i know who have been arrested down there in mexico. they better clean up their act. imagine mexico without u.s. tourism dollars. hopefully this is the last time -- >> senior frog. >> i was not there but i have heard some terrifying tallies. it's not a laughing matter. it sounds funny. but it is scary. this is a hard core. >> notorious for drug runners. congresswoman is going to be be on "fox & friends" 8:15 this morning. she will tell you where he is now and how the family is doing and give us an update. stay tuned for that. >> vacation time for president obama and the first family. could it have come at a worse time? we're 10 days from falling off the fiscal cliff and no deal in sight. >> peter doocy joi
was the limit. that really was her view. it made me think i could do anything. i did go to law school. in the early 1980's when i got out of law school, i went back to tennessee to practice. i was going around to law firms. there were not that many women in the law firms. i had guys interview me. they would sit me down and say, do you understand you have to try cases? >> [laughter] >> i said that is what i wanted to do and was excited about it. i have clients in the beginning, i would go in to meet them. afterwards, one of my partners would say that they say that was not what i expected. he did not know there was going to be a lady lawyer on this case. but i really liked trying cases. it was a lot of fun. then i was drawn into politics. throughout my career, i have been interested in how to change things for the better. i have been very fortunate to have lots of opportunities to serve. >> you mentioned your mother. your mother died of lung cancer. she was such a force in your life. >> i think it made me very strong because it was very clear i had no one to depend on but me. >> 3 the o
consumer law center and the author of several publications including "student loan lot," and "the guide to surviving student debt." next to her is the n.y.u. chief enrollment officer. he is in charge of the office of financial aid. so, to get into the solutions oriented discussion we're going to have today, the problem is something i think everybody is very familiar with, but i think sometimes google's of the sale is an interesting harbinger. if you type in student loan, it will suggest student loan forgiveness. if you type in student debt, it will suggest student debt crisis. this is a problem many people worry about, whether it is at 3:00 a.m. when they cannot sleep or in the hospital staring at their new baby and wondering, how will i do this the way i want to, the way maybe my parents were able to manage in a previous generation. the average student graduates with $26,600 worth of debt and over 13% default within three years. we have more outstanding student at than auto or credit- card debt at this point. many may think it is good that we have more student debt than credit-card deb
nelson alleged a violation of state law, dan, and not federal. >> is it bears repeating, all the judges, male. >> a unanimous decision. >>> coming up next, a sharp left turn into much different territory. we defy you to find cuter video than this. the explanation coming up in the instant index on this sunday evening. she's everything to you. but your erectile dysfunction - that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medications, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sexual activity. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, as this may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. do not drink alcohol in excess with cialis. side effects may include headache, upset stomach, delayed backache or muscle ache. to avoid long-term injury, seek immediate medical help fo
from unemployed to unemployable. and, you know -- no, you cannot pass a law that says you cannot discriminate. you can try but at the end of the day those people have less and less skilled and at trophied and it is hard to -- >> jamie: i said don't be a snob. truly, it is great you have the high-powered job at the corn office ber office but you need to work. >> there are jobs today that didn't existence or 15 years ago. get skills and go back to school but don't go back to school and get cs, you want to be the a student, not the guy at the bottom of the class, nobody wants to hire him. everybody wants to hire the guy at the top of the class with recommendations from the teachers. >> jamie: okay, mom, i'll do my homework! the last thing: say the unemployment numbers come out january, february, march and everyone is excited because they've moved, because -- how do we know whether or not it is because of the temporary jobs or because people who are temporary became permanent. >> there are temporary jobs every year at this time. and when we look at the jobs at least through november
causes people to drive more. there's something called the fundamental law of traffic congestion that establishes that vehicle miles traveled increase roughly one for one with highway miles built. if you build it, they will drive, okay? the only way to make sure that our city streets are moved sufficiently is to charge people for it, to actually do what singapore does, second densest country in the world, and yet you can drive around it effortlylessly because they have that electronic road pricing thing that charges you for using these streets. america's cities are running, essentially, a soviet-style urban transit policy. they used to have grocery stores that would give away eggs and butter at far below market prices, the result was you couldn't get the goods. that's what we do with our city streets. they're a valuable commodity, and as a result, they're the urban equivalent of long lines which are traffic jams. there's no path other than actually making people pay for the cost of their actions. now, we already, of course, pay plenty, and one of the enduring challenges of cities
, which doesn't require 60 votes. reconciliation laws, sunset after ten years, they're not permanent and that's why this one is sunsetting, rather than having done a, you know, a long-term tax reform bill. and tax reform is very difficult. >> why can't we get sunsetting on spending, and no sunsetting on tax cuts. we shouldn't be, that's what we should be sunsetting are the spending bills. we should be talking about wind energy that needs to be sunsetted, soon. you bring up the side of the cliff that no one talks about. the sequester, the automatic spending reduction, i don't think it would be a bad thing if washington took the sequester and showed that they could cut spending. >> because we have a never budget balancing act going on with the journalist pointed out the secret gang of six meetings, that's budgeting by, secret gang of 12 meetings. and-- >> quickly that's what we use today call blue smoke and mirrors in washington and that's why people are upset at washington. don't trust them. david: good to see you. well, the numbers are in and you were not shopping as much as last yea
east. >> and the blizzard, very dangerous. when you hear law enforcement put out the warnings that say if you don't have to go on the roads, don't go on the roads. if you don't have to be out, if you don't have to be traveling, stay home and enjoy the holidays. >> good advice right now. >>> that same storm system dumped several feet of snow on california over the weekend, causing avalanches. and now a second person was -- has died. bill foster was buried yesterday about eight minutes after the intentionally started avalanche got out of hand. a snowboarder in another resort also died in a separate avalanche. the area got several feet of snow over the weekend cretuat g cretuating -- creating those dangerous conditions. >>> our more major story this morning, some disturbing details about the christmas eve killings of two firefighters in rochester, new york. they are included in a letter typed by the hiller allegedly on a typewriter and found by police. >> reporter: the trap that killed two firefighters and injured three other first responders was set by this man, convicted felon william
to find a cure. >>> let's start this half hour with a law signed by russia's president overnight that bans adoptions by u.s. citizens. agonizing news for american couples looking to start or expand their families. nbc's michelle kosinski is here this morning with more. >> it more russian children are adopted here in america than any other country. we're talking tens of thousands of country over the last 20 years or so. as of this morning, russia has just made this illegal effective immediately in a sort of diplomatic dispute with the u.s. that seems to have very little to do with the children. they're like any proud parent. americans posting their stories of adopting russian children, showing their happiness on the internet. >> so we're leaving. >> this family traveled to russia in 2007 overjoyed to adopt ben. >> you've gotten to be a big boy. >> a head full of hair. >> i know. like daddy's. >> a relationship that took nearly a year to get started. >> it's a million pieces of paper. you laugh about it, but it really is quite an intensive process. >> now at home, ben just turned 7, very muc
was a veteran of u.s. military service. he also worked in many law enforcement positions. we're told. and he was in afghanistan, working for the contractor company dime corp. international, a major u.s. contractor in the war zone, working to help mentor and train afghan police forces. this is the latest of the so-called insider attacked that have plagued the forces over the past year. many active duty forces killed, contract contractors. 50 deaths this year. they haven't been able to get a handle on it. hala? >> and these attacks have been increasing. what is the reason behind the increase in attacks. >> this is -- they have increased throughout the year, but over the course of the year, ebbed and flowed, thankfully where there hasn't been one in several weeks. the military, the intelligence effort in the military has been to try to figure out the answer to that very question. what is going on. why is this happening? some of them are said to be taliban infiltrations. but there is a sense we're told that many of them are due, how to describe it, to cultural differences. afghans who feel a gru
gun control laws. now congressman chris murphy, whose district includes newtown, calls the stance "tone deaf and revolting." >>> a real christmas gift, it would be getting to where you're going on time today. storms are causing major travel trouble throughout the nation. it's not only trying to get through snow-covered roads. rain and wind are grounding flights in the warmer parts of the country as well. >>> and finally, christmas will be a good time to do a little star-gazing. jupiter and the moon will be very close together in the sky and very bright. you'll be able to see them even in urban areas. the star of bethlehem may have been a similar astronomical event. i'm told you have to look to the east-southeast sky. wherever that may be. you'll see a bright silvery star. on christmas night. you can tell the children, it's santa returning to the north pole. >> will we be able to see it? isn't it going to be cloudy? >> we're going to have a few clouds in this part. other folks will be able to see it. >> there will be pictures of it. >> thanks for the debbie-downer. >> the upper tho
at conception. but that's not the law. okay? >> and if other people don't believe that, you're tolerant of their views? right? >> and the point is nobody's leaving the country. we have a wide spectrum in america, and we have to work for the common good. and that means sometimes what i mean being co-belligerent. for instance i don't agree with everything that the national organization of women supports. but when they are opposing abortion -- not abortion but pornography that objectifies a body i'm going to go belligerent with them. so i don't happen to agree with everything that my gay friends believe, but when they end to end aids i'm a co-belligerent. we've given millions to fight aids around the world. and we work with both gays straights, i can work with an atheist, a mormon i can work with a muslim a baptist, buddhist, joy, that's one of the issues that we have to work on. the work on what can -- >> the important thing is going to be what you said earlier in terms of same-sex marriage. you have to be tolerant of other people's views. so if they differ with you with
up by law. every americans' paychecks will get considerably smaller. that would be the wrong thing to do for our economy, it would be bad for middle-class families, and it would be bad for businesses that depend on family spending. congress can prevent it if they act right now. i just had a good and constructive discussion here at the white house with leadership about how to prevent the tax hike on the middle class. we may reach an agreement that can pass both houses in time. senators reid and mcconnell are working on such an agreement as we speak, but if an agreement is not reached in time between senator reid and senator mcconnell, then i will urge senator reid to bring to the floor a basic package for an up or down vote to protect the middle class from an income tax hike, extends the vital lifeline of unemployment insurance to 2 million americans looking for a job, and lays the groundwork for future cooperation on more economic growth and deficit reduction. i believe such a proposal could pass both houses with bipartisan majorities as long as those leaders allow it to come to a
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